Yolanda Owens, guest of the Wilmington Friends Reunion Living Witness series, on “How Can Faith – and a Mustard Seed – Change the World?” “





Yolanda Owens will speak on “How can faith – and a mustard seed – change the world?”

Submitted photo

WILMINGTON – The Wilmington Friends Reunion invites the community to attend the final conversation in their Living Witness series. It is devoted to conversations about people bearing witness to the resurrection, rejecting the means of death, and celebrating the arrival of new life.

Presenter Yolanda Owens will seek to answer the question, “How can faith – and a mustard seed – change the world?” »At 2 p.m. on Saturday 4 December

Owens grew up in Columbus. A participant in 4-H and school scouting, she developed her bond with the land at a very young age. Growing up with a garden in her backyard was just the start of her journey that took her to Ghana, West Africa, where she discovered that food is life.

She is a graduate of the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at Ohio State University, where she is also chair of the board of directors of the Alumni Society. An active participant in her community, she and four other women helped found Black Lactation Circle, a breastfeeding support and advocacy group for black mothers in central Ohio.

Owens is a wife, mother, and supporter of those who try to do good for the people and the earth. She is the chief cultivator of Forage + Black.

For those interested in this unique perspective on the intersection of growth and faith, please join us on Zoom at 2pm this Saturday; details can be found at https://wilmingtonfriendsohio.org/fall-2021-conversation-series-living-witness/ and interested participants can register by sending an email to [email protected]

Owens

Yolanda Owens will speak on “How can faith – and a mustard seed – change the world?”




Previous Punjab CM Announces Creation of Exclusive Ramayana, Mahabharta and Srimad Bhagwad Geeta Research Center
Next Lion House: Rewriting the History of Chicago's Historic Wildlife Center in 1912