Center for Community Life in Trinitat Vella / Haz arquitectura


Center for Community Life in Trinitat Vella / Haz arquitectura

© Adria Goula© Jose Hevia© Jose Hevia© Jose Hevia+ 22


  • Area Area of ​​this architecture project Area :
    24757 ft²

  • Year Year of realization of this architectural project

    Year:


    2021


  • Photographs

  • Manufacturers Marks with products used in this architecture project

  • Main architects:

    Carol Beuter Sanchez-Villanueva, Manuel Sanchez-Villanueva Beuter

© Adria Goula
© Adria Goula

Text description provided by the architects. The Community Life Center of Trinitat Vella, located at one of the entrances to the city of Barcelona, ​​is the new multifunctional complex in the district. This public building is the result of an innovative proposal designed in a collaborative spirit to allow residents and social actors in the neighborhood to express themselves. The new space will be part of a pole of community facilities for the neighborhoods of Sant Andreu and Nou Barris to be built in the coming years, which will also include community housing and homes for young people and the elderly. The project is the work of architects Manuel Sánchez-Villanueva and Carol Beuter of Haz Arquitectura, a studio with extensive experience in the construction of public and private facilities in the health, cultural and social sectors, as well as offices and buildings. sports equipments.

© Adria Goula
© Adria Goula
© Jose Hevia
© Jose Hevia

As this is the first building of the future complex, to avoid creating a major contrast with future projects, Haz Arquitectura opted for a simple and abstract exterior design that opens onto a future square that will connect the different facilities. The file revolves around two covered courtyards located on either side of the circulation shaft which provide light and ventilation throughout the building. Inside, the ground floor houses the reception, the canteen and a large entrance that serves as the foyer of the meeting room and can accommodate exhibitions and other activities. On the first floor there is an information and attention point for women and other social services. On the rest of the floors, four in number, offices and spaces for local authorities and associations are organized around a central shaft.

© Jose Hevia
© Jose Hevia

A building that minimizes its carbon footprint. The most used material in the construction of the center is wood. The architects made this decision for various reasons. Firstly, given the rather hostile location of the new facility – on the outskirts of the city, close to one of its busiest traffic nodes – they felt that the comfort conveyed and provided by the wood would give warmth to the volume. In addition, they took into account the fact that in terms of energy, it would help to combat the environmental impact of its carbon footprint, since wood allows the building to absorb CO2 throughout its useful life.

© Jose Hevia
© Jose Hevia

A completely dry construction method was used. A metal framework of beams and pillars has been erected, working in conjunction with a load-bearing system of radiata pine cross-laminated timber panels and ceilings that support and give stability to the whole. Interior linings are limited to areas of plywood plinths to allow passage of electrical and data connections, otherwise interiors are bare CLT structure and metal frame with fire retardant paint.

© Adria Goula
© Adria Goula
Ground floor Plan
Ground floor Plan
Longitudinal section
Longitudinal section
© Jose Hevia
© Jose Hevia
© Jose Hevia
© Jose Hevia

The Trinitat Vell Community Life Center is an example of a passive building. In line with the current trend that one of the main goals of the construction industry is to create passive buildings that minimize energy and material consumption, the design of the center meets all heating and cooling needs. To counteract the low thermal inertia of the wooden construction, the ventilation system exploits the inertia of the ground by placing tubes of clean air in the cutout on the hillside. Taken from the ground, the air circulating in the tubes is heated and discharged into the two covered courtyards which function as large conductors. The renewed air is cool in summer and warm in winter, recovering an ancient Mediterranean building tradition. All rooms draw air from the courtyards and treat it with a fan coil to slightly increase or decrease its temperature and humidity as needed.

© Jose Hevia
© Jose Hevia

All hallway walls and doors incorporate a specific design that returns air through the plenum to central chimneys that bring it to the rooftop engine room. The air is blown directly onto the machines, generating a local atmosphere that is warmer or cooler than the outside environment, allowing them to operate with less effort and less power consumption. Finally, the roof generates 60,000 W of electrical power per year thanks to photovoltaic panels, which makes consumption very close to zero.

© Jose Hevia
© Jose Hevia

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